The Best Way To Paint The Ceiling

Why (and How!) You Should Paint Your Ceiling

Assuming you can find a ladder tall enough, a painted ceiling is very much within reach. (Or you can hire a professional and spare yourself the neck crick.) Furthermore, many designers consider painting the ceiling an essential step: You don’t want a murky yellow-white from a previous tenant mucking up the otherwise crisp design of a room. The much-agreed-upon approach is to mix white paint with a few drops of whatever color you’ve used on the walls—and we support this formula, for those wanting an easy fix—but it isn’t the only way. “I have been considering it the fifth wall for some time,” says colorist and interiors consultant Martin Kesselman, who says that a ceiling should always be painted. “I encourage my clients to be creative with a surface that is equal in size to their total floor space.” Below, he and Caitlin Murray of Black Lacquer Design share their tips for painting a ceiling right.

See it As an Opportunity, Rather Than a Task

Kesselman points out that in a small space, where opportunities for design are limited, a ceiling presents itself as an additional canvas. “Thankfully, from a color perspective, I have the ceiling to work with,” he says of rooms that don’t fit too much else. If you don’t know where to start, and are starting from scratch, look up.

To Play It Safe, Play Off the Walls

Add that barely perceptible few drops of the wall color into your white ceiling paint, or try a more obviously related (and bold) combo like a pale blue ceiling and navy walls. “I love the idea of color-blocking with a light and dark version of the same hue,” says Murray. Red walls and a pink ceiling, or a hunter green ceiling atop mossy walls, are some other variations.

Or Get One More Bucket of Your Wall Color

Kesselman has become fond of painting ceilings the same color as the walls for an enveloping look, sometimes even coating the cornice and base skirting too if they have clean lines. You can even try matching your furniture to this color scheme for a monochromatic look—we’ve got tips for pulling it off right.

Try a Dark Color to Open Up a Space

“Sometimes clients are reluctant to go so dark for fear that it will enclose rather than open the room,” Murray says, “but instead it almost gives a feeling of infinity—like outer space.” Kesselman echoes the sentiment, recommending dark paint especially if you have a low-slung ceiling. “A darker value creates the illusion that the ceiling opens up like a night sky—I’ve taken this approach in many bedroom designs. It’s a warm, comforting feeling, like resting under the stars, all blanketed up. It’s also quite romantic.”

Choose Your Finishes Wisely

While a high-gloss finish can lend a striking appearance to a ceiling, as in this svelte Brooklyn living room, Murray points out that it’ll highlight any imperfections: “Both natural and artificial light have a tendency to bounce off of ceilings in a way that shows all flaws if there’s the smallest hint of sheen.” For that reason, she prefers a flat finish, especially if you’ve selected a dark color.

Don’t Forget About Wallpaper

A little more time-intensive, yes, but the look will feel so customized. Murray loves it especially in smaller rooms, like bathrooms. “A contrasting or unexpected ceiling paint color can add instant interest and anchor a room,” she says.

 

How to paint a ceiling and walls

Painting tips from Which? Trusted trader, Extreme Handyman Fencing & Decorating Service’ Dene Walker will help you get your home decorating done in no time.

You don’t have to be Michelangelo to paint a ceiling. Admittedly, it might help if you’re attempting something along the lines of the Sistine Chapel, but if you just want a couple of coats of emulsion, it’s definitely something you can tackle yourself. If the idea of painting above your head makes your shoulders ache, you can find an endorsed painter & decorator with Which? Trusted Traders to take it on for you.

If you’re up to the challenge, ensure you have the right tools for the job. As a minimum, you’ll need:

  • a roller
  • a telescopic roller extension to avoid needing to use a ladder
  • a 2 or 3-inch paintbrush

The best paint for ceilings is a simple matt emulsion. Specialist ceiling paints do exist – they’re formulated to avoid spatter and dry slowly – but a simple white matt emulsion is fine for most jobs.

Prepare the room

You’ll need to clear and cover the area to avoid damage from drips or spatters. Remove as much of your furniture and ornaments as possible from the room, then cover the floor and anything you can’t move with dust sheets or protective plastic.

If you’re planning to protect areas you don’t want painting with masking tape, use the best tape you can afford, and be aware that it may still allow some paint underneath. An alternative is a painting shield, which costs about £5 and can be reused. You hold the shield with one hand to mask an area, while you paint with the other hand.

Prepare the surfaces

Planning and preparation is the secret to a professional finish when painting. With any decorating project, you start at the top and work your way down, so always work on the ceiling first.

Start by scraping away any flaking paint or other lumps. Fill any large holes or cracks with a suitable filler product.

If there are stains on the surfaces, such as grease or watermarks, these need treating with a shellac-based stain blocker product to seal them in, before you start painting.

For hairline cracks in the ceilings or walls use a knife or old screwdriver to enlarge the crack slightly before filling. Giving the filler more space means it won’t fall out as it dries.

If you need to deal with a hairline crack in a corner or around woodwork, use a cartridge gun to apply decorative caulk (not silicone). Squeeze it into the gap and carefully smooth it with a wet finger or sponge. Allow it to dry according to the manufacturer’s instructions – you can overpaint most varieties within an hour.

All surfaces must be clean, dust-free, and completely dry before you start.

Cover any light fittings in the ceiling with low-tack masking tape to keep them free from paint. If you’re planning to paint the walls next, you may want to cover the wall fittings at this stage, too.

Painting the ceiling

Once the walls are ready you can prepare the paint. Dilute the paint with water or commercial thinner by 10% to reduce the ‘orange peel’ effect left by rollers.

Use a medium pile roller, with a telescopic roller pole, that holds enough paint to cover a large area at a time. Work across the width of the room for the first coat and along the length of the room for the second, working away from the direction of the light. Always leave four hours between coats to avoid peeling in the future.

Ensure you keep a wet paint edge while you are working, otherwise you will get a ‘shut’, which is a line created where you overlap and have let the leading edge dry. This means that once you start, you cannot stop until the wall or ceiling is completed.

If the ceiling starts peeling then stop painting, as the roller will cause more damage and deposit the peeled paint onto other area which will ruin all your hard work. You will need to paint the ceiling with specialist anti-peel paint before reapplying the top coat.

Always cut in (paint the areas that are too tight for large rollers) while the ceiling is still wet. You can quickly get around the ceiling edges using a 2-inch brush or a mini roller – a small step or ‘hop up’ will help with this.

Try to avoid getting paint down the walls, even if you are going to paint them afterwards as the white ceiling paint may ‘flash’  through the new wall colours.

Allow the paint to dry before removing any masking tape from around fittings.

Painting newly plastered surfaces

If you’re working with newly plastered ceiling or walls, or you’ve filled any holes, start by painting a mist coat. A mist coat is a matt emulsion, thinned right down with water or a commercial thinner, to seal the surface and provide a strong base for the top coat of paint to stick to. Never use emulsions with vinyl for a mist coat. You can buy paints designed for new plaster if you don’t fancy mixing your own. The mist coat will reveal smaller imperfections that you can tackle with filler and sand flat. You may need more than one coat to cover the wall evenly.

It is a good idea to do a mist coat under any strong colour change, particularly if you are going over reds or blues.

Painting walls

If you needed a mist coat, wait for it to dry before applying the first coat. Check the manufacturer’s guidelines for ventilation, drying time and other instructions and once again thin the paint slightly. Paint with vinyl in it is more durable and preferable for heavy-use areas. Apply at least two coats – several light coats of paint are usually better than one heavy one. Painting in daylight will help you to avoid getting a patchy finish.

Once again, roll the main body of the wall first. Use a paint tray and apply the roller with gentle, steady pressure. Be careful not to overload it. When the roller stops sounding ‘wet’, reload it with paint.

Roll one wall then cut it in whilst it is wet before proceeding to the next wall. Start at the top and work your way down. Begin by ‘cutting in’ (using a paint brush to cover the areas that are too tight for rollers) at the ceiling line, painting each wall methodically. Use firm, horizontal strokes in line with the ceiling for a straight line. If you’re working on a vertical join, you may find it easier to rotate the brush to paint with the narrow side.

If you’ve used masking tape, peel this off gently while the wall is still wet before starting on the next wall. If paint seeps through the tape, wipe away with a damp cloth.

 

Helpful Tips for Painting a Ceiling

If you fear painting your ceiling, you are not alone. Most painters, professional, amateur, and otherwise, dislike this uniquely awkward and messy job. Painting over your head is strenuous and full of drips making it hard to judge whether you are getting all of it covered. To add insult to injury, in most cases you are only re-painting the ceiling white again. While it is always nice to freshen up your space, this is not a change that will rock your world. With all that in mind, there are several ways to make your ceiling painting project go as smoothly as possible.

Stick With a Roller

You can paint a ceiling with a paint sprayer, but by the time you get the sprayer set up and every non-paintable item covered—which usually means every single item in the room—you could have already painted your ceiling with a roller. Paint rollers will give you the best coverage with much less splatter than paint sprayers.

Use Good Ladders

Scaffolding is certainly nice to work from, but it takes forever to build up a room’s worth of scaffolding, or you have to move around a smaller portion of scaffolding to follow your painting. Plus, the only real scaffolding you should use comes at a cost from a rental yard, not from scraps of wood and cinder blocks lying around your yard.

A good stepladder is stable and easy to move around. Make sure the ladder is tall enough so that you’re not going higher than two rungs from the top (your knees should be below the top of the ladder. If your ceiling isn’t very tall, you might get away with a good 4-foot ladder, which is easy to move with one hand.

Use the Right Extension Pole

For a standard 8-, 9-, or 10-foot ceiling, you can do much of the rolling from the ground, using an extension pole. Just be sure to use the shortest possible extension to minimize the weight of the pole. For example, if you have a 17-foot extension to paint an 8-foot ceiling, that means that nearly 10 feet of the aluminum pole is collapsed into the handle. This creates more weight for you and will cause strain on your shoulders, arms, and lower back.

Accept That the Ceiling Is Its Own Project

After a long weekend of painting your room’s walls and trim, it is tempting to want to dash off a coat of paint on your ceiling. Bad idea. Ceilings are often called the “fifth wall.” It is a saying that emphasizes the oft-forgotten design aspects of the ceiling. But it also emphasizes that ceilings are a big, gnarly project. Devote an entire weekend to a ceiling or two, and you will be happier.

Go With Flat White Ceiling Paint

Resist the temptation to paint your ceiling a funky color. If you want funk, there are lots of walls and other surfaces for adding bold colors. Accent walls are practically begging for them. Ceilings? Not so much. It is no mistake or accidental omission flat white is still the preferred finish for most ceilings. Flat white ceiling paint has the advantages of:

  • More light: White offers a high degree of light bounce, making your entire room brighter.
  • Infinite view: White provides a limitless vista that your eyes have a hard time focusing on. In other words, when you look at a blue surface, it appears to have a stopping point. However, when you look at a well-painted flat white surface, it appears to go on infinitely. This gives the room a feeling of more space.
  • Flat is best: A flat or matte sheen—as opposed to satin, eggshell, glossy, or otherwise—further enhances the appearance of a limitless vista. Reflections of light on a ceiling, due to any type of gloss, will tell the eye that this is where the surface “stops.” Flat paint also hides imperfections much better than glossy paint.

Prepare for Inevitable Drips

Just try painting a ceiling without creating drips. This will not work. Even the most fastidious professional will create drips when painting ceilings. Yes, you might get by without drop cloths (if you want) for walls and other vertical areas, but this is impossible to do with ceilings.

Work in Grids

Work in (imaginary) 3-by-3-foot sections. If you work in larger areas than that, you lose track of where you have painted, especially since this is a white-on-white project. One trick is to cast a laser level’s light on the ceiling. The line keeps you on track, and you can move the line as you progress. To prevent permanent roller marks, start each new section by overlapping onto the wet edges of the preceding section. This is called “keeping a wet edge,” and it helps to blend each section seamlessly into the next.

 

How to Minimize Streaking When Painting a Ceiling

It’s more difficult to paint the ceiling of a room than the walls. It’s tiring to apply upward force on a roller, and you can’t always get the paint to spread out evenly. Moreover, the ceiling usually has a larger surface area than any of the walls, and instead of painting it all at once, you may have to divide it into sections. All of these factors can combine to make it harder to avoid streaking and lap marks. You don’t have to settle for a subpar paint job, though, if you know a few pointers.

  • Use ceiling paint. Manufacturers produce specialty products for use on the ceiling that spatter less, and show areas of poor coverage and streaks. These areas remain obvious while the paint is wet so you know where to re-coat.
  • Roll with a medium- to thick-nap roller and frequently reload it. A roller is more likely to streak when it runs out of paint.
  • Cut-in the corners of the ceiling by painting them with a paintbrush, then roll the rest of the ceiling before the corners dry. It’s easier to avoid streaks if you roll over paint that is still wet. For the same reason, you should roll the entire length of the ceiling at once. If that isn’t possible, work in the largest sections you can manage.
  • Spread paint over a section by making several “M” patterns, then roll in parallel lines, overlapping the previous line by one-third of the width of the roller when you make a new one.
  • Hold the roller so its open side faces the part of the wall you’ve already painted. There is less pressure on that side, so there is less likelihood of forming ridges on the overlap.
  • Let the paint dry after rolling the ceiling, then re-roll it in the perpendicular direction. This produces a cross-hatch pattern that virtually eliminates streaking and lap marks.

Things You Will Need:

  • Ceiling paint
  • Medium- or thick-nap roller
  • Paintbrush
  • Paint roller

Tip :Avoid blotches caused by uneven paint absorption by priming the ceiling with drywall primer before you paint it.

Make sure you have enough paint for complete coverage. If you start to run out and try to stretch it by pushing hard on the roller, you’re more likely to create streaks.

 

How to Fix Paint Roller Marks After Drying

Despite the proliferation of hand-held airless sprayers on the market, using a roller remains the most efficient way to paint a single room, especially one that is full of furniture. Roller marks, which painters sometimes call “holidays,” are a routine hazard when painting with a roller, and there are many ways to avoid them. When you notice holidays after the paint has dried, you can usually make them disappear by applying another coat after sanding lightly—if necessary—to remove drips and humps. If your wall is full of roller marks after the second coat, chances are you forgot to clean and prime the wall before painting, or you’re using the wrong type of paint or the wrong mixture.

Touching Up Holidays

Holidays can occur when you’re trying to save paint and you attempt to squeeze more out of your roller than is actually there. They can also occur because the nap of the roller sleeve is too short. Either way, the result is a noticeable lack of paint in one or more parts of the surface you’re painting. The remedy is simple: cover the holidays with more paint.

In most cases, you can use a brush to touch up roller marks, but that might not work in high-end jobs because brush streaks can be noticeable on a rolled wall. In that case, you should use a roller to make the touch-up, and the roller should preferably be the same one you’ve already been using. The marks will tell you which way the roller was moving when it made them. Move the roller in the same direction when touching up to ensure uniformity of texture.

What About Sanding?

It’s rare to have to sand a wall or ceiling before touching up roller marks, but that may be necessary if you notice drips or if you’re if using textured paint. When you have to sand, use 120- or 150-grit sandpaper, and apply light pressure. The point is simply to flatten the dried paint, not remove it. Be sure to wipe the sanding dust off the surface before you repaint.

Avoiding Roller Marks

It’s virtually impossible to avoid roller marks when applying a single coat of paint to a wall or ceiling. Most jobs require two coats, especially if there is a significant color difference between the existing color and the new one. If you still have holidays after applying two coats, here are some changes you can make to your technique and equipment:

Use a 1/2-inch roller cover. You may be using a cover with a 1/4-inch nap, which is intended for use on perfectly smooth surfaces. Your wall may look smooth, but the roller marks are telling you that it isn’t. Change the cover.

Load up more frequently. Whenever you notice yourself putting pressure on the roller to squeeze out paint, it’s time to load up. You won’t save any paint by squeezing out paint if you have to go back and apply another coat.

Roll over the wet edge. A natural consequence of the U-shape construction of most rollers is that the end of the roller near the handle exerts more pressure on the wall than the other end. Keeping the far end of the roller on a part of the surface you’ve already painted minimizes roller marks that occur because of this pressure difference.

Always prime new wood, masonry and drywall: Primer is an adhesive that seals porous materials and prevents paint from soaking in. If you omit the primer, you’ll find it difficult to avoid roller marks, even after applying two coats or more.

Good Electric Wiring For Buildings

The Electric Wiring of Buildings

THERE are many practical hints in this little book which appeal to common sense, although from the point of view of the ordinary electric wireman they are quite unorthodox. The author points out, for example, that the wiring of many houses is spoilt by placing the wall sockets indiscriminately without regard to the position or character of the apparatus to be connected to them. It is as absurd to place the wall socket for a floor standard lamp or vacuum cleaner three feet from the floor as to put one for a table standard at floor level, if the table is to be against the wall. It is quite right to put the wall socket for an electric fire on the skirting, but the almost universal practice of placing the switch there as well is foolish. It is true that this saves the cost of a wood block and a few feet of wire, but this saving of a shilling or two on capital cost is only effected by compelling people for ever afterwards to stoop down to the floor when they want to switch on or off the electric fire. The book finishes up with a useful chapter on bells, telephones, fire alarms, and radio. As a rule, it is advisable to have all these kinds of wiring done before the building is actually furnished. In the case of telephones, however, it is sometimes difficult to tell which is the most suitable place for them before the house is furnished, and hence surface wiring is very frequently used for telephone work. The proper wiring of all electric radio receiving sets deserves special care. Unless the Institution of Electrical Engineers Wiring Regulations, published in June 1928, be followed, there may be danger from shock or fire.

 

Electrical Safety Tips

Before you tackle any electrical task, review these top safety concerns.

When installing or using your electrical system, there is always the chance of shock. Now there will be some DIYers who are comfortable with basic wiring practices; however, unless you’re absolutely qualified for system installation, DIY recommends you leave the installation of your home’s electrical system to licensed electricians.

Not only will a licensed electrician make sure your electrical system meets with all required safety codes, they can also oversee the installation of common safety products. For example, one of the most common items added to your electrical system is a ground fault circuit interruptor — or GFCIs for short.

By installing a ground fault circuit interruptor — or ground fault circuit breakers — you can protect areas that may be moist, such as bathrooms and kitchens. A ground fault interruptor is an electrical device designed to protect you from serious injury due to shock.

GFCIs constantly monitor the electricity flowing in a circuit. Should that current be interrupted for any reason — or waver by even the slightest amount — the GFCI will instantly shut down the current flowing through that circuit.

Note: A GFCI will respond to a current variation too small for even a circuit breaker or fuse to detect.

Along with GFCIs there are a number of simple precautions you can take at home that will prevent injuries related to your home’s electrical systems. Here’s a rundown:

  • Always remove cords from a socket by grabbing the plug. Never tug on an appliance cord. Removing cords in this fashion can lead to fraying, and frayed cords can cause electrical shock.
  • Frayed cords that are under or on carpet can cause a fire and should be replaced or repaired.
  • Always use the recommended wattage bulb in lamps and light fixtures.
  • Avoid using electrical appliances in wet places. If you must work in a wet or damp area, always use a portable GFCI outlet for the needed appliance.
  • Never overload an outlet.

 

Make Your Home Safer with an Electrical Wiring Upgrade

Electrical wiring can be hazardous in your home if it is outdated or damaged. Faulty wiring and overload power strips can cause an electrical fire. And if you have unprotected electrical outlets, it can burn or shock you if you accidentally touch it. With these in mind, here are some reasons why you should do an upgrade now and tips on how to properly do it.

  • Electrical Wiring Hazards to Look For

The first step in doing an electrical wiring upgrade in Singapore is to inspect your home and check your existing wiring connections to immediately identify if they pose serious threats to your home and your family.

The most common electrical problems include outdated wiring, electrical appliances left plugged in near water sources, wrong wattage light bulbs, overload power outlets, damaged extension cords, improperly used circuit breakers,  and poor electrical installation.

  • DIY or Seek Professional Help?

Don’t fall into the trap of believing you can save less if you’ll do the upgrade on your own. While there are electric works that you can do yourself, upgrading and updating your electrical wiring in Singapore is certainly not one of those. This kind of job isn’t appropriate for DIY as it is best left to the experts. Remember that only one mistake can easily turn into a disaster and damage your home which can cost you more in the long run.

If you’re living in an old home, it’s strongly recommended finding an electrician who has vast experience working on such homes. The procedure is quite complicated and it requires technical knowledge and understanding especially if your home is30 years or older.

Aside from your home’s age, other signs that you need to call an electrician immediately sparking electrical wires and cables, flickering light fixtures, fuses blowing repeatedly, dimming of lights, burning smell from an appliance, and obsolete electrical panels.

Moreover, when you work with an expert and seek his electrical services, you can have peace of mind knowing that he exactly knows what he’s doing.

  • Prepare Your Budget

An electrical wiring upgrade can be expensive, but money should not be an issue when it’s necessary for the safety and convenience of your home. It just actually depends on your choice of electrician; so, it’s worth doing your research to find a company or someone from whom you can get the most out of your money.

Hiring one that offers the cheapest upgrade and installation service without considering their experience and skills will only put you at risk. Don’t settle for cheap just to save money. Instead, you should be hiring one with proper qualifications and a proven track record of success and recommendations. And when going through the candidates you have chosen, make sure to break them down into categories to make a well-informed decision.

  • Let the Experts do the Upgrade

If you still think that you can afford to upgrade your electrical wiring in Singapore on your own, pushed that thought away. When it comes to dealing with wiring works, always call in the experts.

 

Electrician wiring a home

Different Types of Electrical Wirings

When you want to change the wiring of your home, you will have the choice of selecting from several kinds of wirings available in Singapore.

Even if you hire a professional to do the wiring/rewiring, you can still give your opinion about the kind of wiring you want. The different kinds of electrical wiring which are available in the market are listed below:

  • Non-Metallic Cables (NM Cables)

NM cables are the most common types of wires which are used in houses and residential buildings in Singapore. They contain three types of wires distinguished by different colors.

A red or brown wire inside the cable signifies a live wire that carries the current. A black or blue wire is the neutral wire and a green or yellow one signifies the ground wire. These types of cables are usually suited for dry spaces such as rooms of houses or offices.

  • Underground Feeder (UF)

Underground feeder can be considered a subclass of NM cables with the difference being that in UF cables, each of the three wires are covered individually by a solid plastic sheathing.

The three wires are the same as NM cables namely a live wire, a ground wire, and a neutral wire. All these three wires are covered separately as opposed to the NM cables where they are enclosed together. UF cables are mostly used for wet and damp areas such as the kitchen, bathroom, or other exposed areas.

  • Conduits

Conduits are the types of wires which are mostly used in houses but not as part of the inner wiring of the house. These wires and cables are visible on the walls and ceilings of the rooms. In these cables, the electric wires are encased in a plastic or metallic tube.

They are insulated by a layer of nylon which gives them the thermoplasticity that makes them highly heat resistant. Because of their good insulation, they can be used in dry as well as wet places.

  • Low Voltage Wires

Low voltage wires basically comprise two set of wires that are used for those sockets and circuits which are of low voltage. They are enclosed in a plastic casing and contain only two wires as opposed to NM cables that have three wires.

  • Aluminum Coated Lead Wires

For more high-power and intricate needs, aluminum coated lead wires are used. Lead is a heavy metal which does not get easily affected by corrosion or humid conditions. It is coated with an alloy of lead and aluminum making it extra durable and strong. It does not get damaged from extreme weather conditions or other wear and tear like other types of electrical cables.

 

HOW TO TELL IF YOUR HOUSE NEEDS WIRING REPAIR

Wiring Repairs in New HavenThe electrical wiring in your home is normally present in every room in the house. 1972 and prior built homes contained wiring which didn’t last as long because it was more susceptible to shorting and wear.

The insulation and other materials are likely degraded if your home is this old and hasn’t had a complete rewiring. Regardless of the material, the wiring will eventually need repairs, especially at any point where it connects to something such as outlets, fixtures, or switches.

When electrical wires start to get old, the first problems are usually seen at a point where it connects to something. Common problems include the expansion and contraction of the electrical wiring material over time. Eventually, the connections can become loose and will then need repair. But it’s not always easy to know when something goes wrong.

The problem with electrical wiring is that it is not easily accessible. It runs inside the walls and ceilings of your home. Power then runs through the wire and is controlled by the panel box where your circuit breakers are located. The other side of the wire runs to outlets or fixtures.

 Signs Your Wiring Needs To Be Repaired

One sure sign that your outlet wiring needs repair is if you plug something in and it doesn’t fit snugly or it won’t go in all the way. This is a dangerous situation and the outlet should be repaired right away. Electricity can arc from the wiring to you, causing electrical shock. The outlet can also send a surge of power that will short out anything plugged in at the time.

If your lights are flickering when you use the microwave or sometimes won’t respond when you flip the switch, this is another sure sign the wiring is getting old and needs repair. There are times when it’s so old it has to be completely replaced throughout the house. This happens when the insulation that protects each wire deteriorates. Most of the time, there is a simple explanation for this but either way, you will want to have someone qualified to take a look at the problem.

Sometimes the problem can be with a fixture or the item you are trying to plug in. If it’s a fixture that is permanently attached to the home, you will want to have it repaired or replaced. Be sure you check the simple things first such as replacing a light bulb and checking for a tripped breaker.

One time, a lady was at home and heard a loud pop. She went outside to the air conditioner where she thought it came from and the breaker to the unit was black and smoking. Any strange noises or smells warrant a call to an electrician. It is not worth having a house fire due to dangerous wiring. The lady had an electrician check the damage so she found out that the entire circuit had been fried by ants crawling around in the outside A/C breaker box.

Pest Control Is The Only Solution For Cockroaches

American Cockroach Control

The American cockroach is the largest of the species common to Pennsylvania. This species often becomes abundant in city dumps and is most common in the basements and steam tunnels of restaurants, bakeries, food-processing facilities, and grocery stores.

Adults are approximately 1-1/2 inches long and reddish brown, with fully developed wings that cover the entire length of the abdomen. Both male and female are fully winged. The wings of the male extend slightly beyond the tip of the abdomen, while those of the female are about the same length as the abdomen. Nymphs are similar in appearance but are smaller and do not have wings. American cockroaches are capable of flying but rarely do in northern areas of the United States. The American cockroach can be identified by its large size and reddish brown color with faded yellow edges on the thorax.

When indoors, the nymphs and adults are usually found in dark, warm and moist areas of basements and crawl spaces, and in and around bathtubs, clothes hampers, floor drains, pipe chases, and sewers. They are also common around the manholes of sewers, and on the undersides of metal covers over large sump pumps. In the north, this cockroach is often associated with steam heat tunnels. Where steam heat tunnels are not found, the American cockroach is restricted primaril to large institutional buildings. It has also been observed migrating from one building to another during warm months in the north. Occasionally, the cockroaches infest sanitary landfills and can survive Pennsylvania winters because of the warmth generated within the piles of trash.

American cockroaches feed on a variety of foods, with an apparent preference for decaying organic matter. The adults can survive two or three months without food but only about a month without water.

 

Low Impact Approaches

The following cockroach control measures are effective in disrupting the roach life cycle, killing existing roaches, and their colony when implemented together. The guidelines below also serve as excellent preventative measures that effectively stop cockroach invasions before they begin.

Inspection

Look for cockroach hiding spots in warm, dark, tight places near food and water using a flashlight and mirror. Confirm any suspected habitats by using sticky traps. These traps will not attract cockroaches, but they will allow you to determine if you have an infestation, and where the bugs are living. Sticky traps should be placed at the seam of floors and walls, and in potential high traffic areas. Carefully check large appliances and furniture or items that have been in storage for cockroach egg cases and destroy them.

Home Cleaning

If you have an infestation, eliminate food sources by cleaning up crumbs on floors, in cracks and crevices, or on counters. Wipe up spills and clean dirty dishes as soon as possible, and keep food in sealed containers or in the refrigerator. Throw trash away in containers with liners and tight lids, and empty them frequently. Regularly vacuum cracks and crevices to remove any food sources, including cockroach eggs or droppings, since feces contain pheromones that attract other roaches and feed young ones. Frequent vacuuming also goes a long way in preventing cockroach allergies.

Eliminate Habitat and Prevent Entry

Removing cockroach hiding places and entry points will drive cockroaches away and prevent future infestations. Inside the home, seal cracks in dark places like cupboards or building cracks with caulk, repair water leaks, and remove moisture in crawl spaces and other dark areas by increasing ventilation. Weather-seal doors and gaps around windows, and caulk around escutcheon plates that surround pipes or faucets that provide access to the wall voids or any other area that roaches could easily enter or hide. Eliminate clutter, especially piles of magazines, newspapers, cardboard or rags.  Outside, remove stacks of wood and trash to minimize potential moist habitats, and trim shrubs and branches to increase light and ventilation.

Cockroach prevention tips

In addition to various do-it-yourself cockroach repellents, there are also a number of practical steps you can take to keep cockroaches out and prevent an infestation.

Eliminate food sources – store dry foods in tightly sealed containers or in sealed plastic bags and do not leave food sitting out on counters. Do not leave liquids in sinks or buckets.

Clear all waste food and liquid spillage – clean up food debris from food preparation areas, under sinks and appliances. Empty the rubbish on a daily basis and keep all garbage or compost in sealed bins.

Remove pet food – and drink and litter trays before nightfall.

Rinse cans, bottles and plastics – before putting them in recycling bins.

De-clutter – remove old stacks of newspapers and magazines, unused cardboard boxes and all other forms of clutter from the floor or bottom of cupboards. Cockroaches release an aggregation pheromone in their droppings telling others they have found a safe harborage.

Varnish or paint wood shelves – to seal them, and wipe them clean regularly.

Seal entry points – to deny access to cockroaches. Key risks are gaps around pipes, drains and common walls with neighboring properties when dealing with German, Oriental and American cockroaches. Even tiny cracks around skirting boards and behind electrical sockets should be plugged to reduce potential hiding areas.

 

Cockroach Infestations

If an infestation does happen, chances are you will need to bring in an expert Exterminator in Philadelphia to aid with the cockroach extermination in Philadelphia. With over two decades of experience has the necessary skills and qualifications to appropriately assess your cockroach problem and draft up a custom tailored remedy to exterminate cockroaches in your business, home, office or rental property.

As cockroaches are nocturnal insects there should be cause for alarm if you notice one crawling around during the day. This usually means that there is a larger cockroach infestation that you are not noticing when it is dark. Places to check for an infestation include behind refrigerators, sinks, stoves and under floor drains. Cockroaches can also flatten their bodies to fit into small and narrow spots and may be found hiding underneath mats and within cracks in your walls. Additionally, The Ardvark is your go to crew for Ant Extermination in Philadelphia.

Additionally, some species of cockroaches emit a strong musty odor that is unpleasant to humans. They also tend to lay oval-shaped eggs behind furniture and sometimes even between books and other nooks and crannies.

HABITAT

The American cockroach is said to thrive in warm temperatures. They can only survive in temperatures averaging around 29°C. Due to this, they generally cannot adapt to dry areas unless they have access to water. Their main breeding grounds are damp or moist areas. They generally cannot survive in cold or warmer continents but due to the development and increase of residential areas, buildings, and other houses, the American cockroaches was able to adapt and live in these areas. This is why cockroaches generally live in the basements or sewers of buildings and the like.

The American Cockroach is known to be the fastest of all running insects. Thus, they can travel very fast and can quickly run into tight and closed areas such as cracks and even the gaps under the door.  Fastest known recorded speeds of roaches run up to 3.4 miles per hour allowing it to easily run pass 50 of their body lengths in just one second. Like many insects, roaches have compound eyes having over 2000 eyes in each lens.